Aspergillus Toxins in Food and Animal Feedingstuffs

  • Keith A. Scudamore
Part of the Federation of European Microbiological Societies Symposium Series book series (FEMS, volume 69)

Abstract

When moulds grow, many different metabolites may be produced. The number of these recorded in the literature runs into thousands and many more undoubtedly await identification and investigation. Secondary fungal metabolites can be regarded as chemicals produced which are not necessary for the growth of the producing organism. They are a group of sustances with a diverse range of structures, and chemical and physical properties. Amongst them are compounds of considerable current benefit to man and others with still unrecognised potential. In contrast, some are extremely toxic and their physiological effects are as wide in action as their properties. These latter substances are known as mycotoxins.

Keywords

Natural Occurrence Coffee Bean Aflatoxin Contamination Cyclopiazonic Acid Immunoaffinity Column 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1994

Authors and Affiliations

  • Keith A. Scudamore
    • 1
  1. 1.Central Science LaboratoryMinistry of Agriculture, Fisheries and FoodSlough, BerkshireUK

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