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Biologic Markers: Monitoring Populations Exposed to Pesticides

  • Raymond E. GrissomJr.
Part of the NATO · Challenges of Modern Society book series (NATS, volume 19)

Abstract

Pesticides are used extensively throughout the world to control or eradicate environmental pests. Their use can be of vital importance in producing a successful crop. When properly used, pesticides do not cause adverse health effects in humans. Improper use of these substances, however, can result in adverse health effects ranging from minor dermal irritation to death.

Keywords

Biologic Marker Adverse Health Effect Methyl Parathion Pesticide Exposure Dermal Exposure 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1995

Authors and Affiliations

  • Raymond E. GrissomJr.

There are no affiliations available

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