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Role of Maternal and Dual-Earner Employment Status in Children’s Development

A Longitudinal Study from Infancy through Early Adolescence
  • Adele Eskeles Gottfried
  • Kay Bathurst
  • Allen W. Gottfried

Abstract

The research reported in this chapter is concerned with investigating the role of maternal employment in children’s development in our longitudinal study from infancy through early adolescence. In our prior research (A. E. Gottfried, A. W. Gottfried, & Bathurst, 1988), we studied maternal employment and children’s development from infancy (1 year) through early childhood (7 years) and found no differences between the children of employed and nonemployed mothers. Further, we examined the environmental contexts of the children and found that, although there were few differences, the employed mothers held consistently higher educational attitudes for their children from the preschool years onward. Interestingly, the fathers of children with employed mothers were significantly more involved with their children.

Keywords

Home Environment Maternal Employment Father Involvement Parental Occupation Family Environment Scale 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1994

Authors and Affiliations

  • Adele Eskeles Gottfried
    • 1
  • Kay Bathurst
    • 2
  • Allen W. Gottfried
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Educational Psychology and CounselingCalifornia State UniversityNorthridgeUSA
  2. 2.Department of PsychologyCalifornia State UniversityFullertonUSA

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