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Demography and Changing Families

Introduction to the Issues
  • Adele Eskeles Gottfried
  • Allen W. Gottfried

Abstract

Family change is pervasive. We need only read our daily newspapers—or watch television news—to be exposed to the vast diversity of family forms in existence. Moreover, demographic data on the U.S. population has tracked family structure over a 75-year period and provides documentation of family changes (Wetzel, 1990). The traditional family (i.e., a two-parent family in which the father is the sole economic provider and the mother is the primary caretaker; Macklin, 1987), is now the minority family among those with children. In 1988, of families with children under 18 years old, only 32.7% consisted of married couples in which the father was the sole provider. Some of the most prominent trends concerning family change (Wetzel, 1990) include the entry of women into the work force, delayed childbearing, family dissolution, single-parenting, and the growth of nonfamily households (individuals living together but unrelated biologically or legally).

Keywords

Longitudinal Research Married Couple Maternal Employment Family Change Primary Caretaker 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1994

Authors and Affiliations

  • Adele Eskeles Gottfried
    • 1
  • Allen W. Gottfried
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Educational Psychology and CounselingCalifornia State UniversityNorthridgeUSA
  2. 2.Department of PsychologyCalifornia State UniversityFullertonUSA

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