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Abstract

The roadside sign, erected by one or another of the federal relief agencies of those Depression years, stated that the nearby ruins were the remains of the Spanish mission of San Antonio de Anacape, one of several built in the seventeenth century along the east coast of Florida. There was no reason that I, a mere high school student, should doubt that authority, and I pushed my way through the tangled undergrowth of the hammock until at last I located a large circular stone well. There was not much light, but I made a vain attempt to record the structure with my Jiffy Kodak, ignoring the mosquitoes which gathered on my hands with their tails directed sharply upward. That was in the late summer of 1935, and I spent much of the ensuing fall abed with malaria and resulting complications.

Keywords

Historical Archaeology Historical Site Sugar Mill Burial Mound Shell Midden 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

  1. Boyd, Mark F., Hale G. Smith, and John W. Griffin, 1951, Here They Once Stood. University of Florida Press, Gainesville.Google Scholar
  2. Coulter, E. Merton (editor), 1937, Georgia’s Disputed Ruins. University of North Carolina Press, Chapel Hill.Google Scholar
  3. Griffin, John W., 1945, History and Archaeology in Florida. Florida Historical Quarterly 23(3):184–190.Google Scholar
  4. Griffin, John W., 1952, The Addison Blockhouse. Florida Historical Quarterly 30(3):276–293.Google Scholar
  5. Griffin, John W., 1962, Archaeological Explorations at the Oldest House, 1954. In Evolution of the Oldest House. Florida State University Notes in Anthropology 7:31–42.Google Scholar
  6. Griffin, John W. and Albert C. Manucy, 1962, The Development of Housing in St. Augustine to 1783. In Evolution of the Oldest House. Florida State University Notes in Anthropology 7:3–19.Google Scholar
  7. Griffin, John W. and Hale G. Smith, 1948, The Goodnow Mound, Highlands County, Florida. Contributions to the Archaeology of Florida 1. Tallahassee.Google Scholar
  8. Griffin, John W. and Hale G. Smith, 1949, Nocoroco: a Timucua Village of 1605 now in Tomoka State Park. Florida Historical Quarterly 27(4): 340–361.Google Scholar
  9. Smith, Hale G. and Ripley P. Bullen, 1971, Fort San Carlos. Florida State University Notes in Anthropology 14.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1994

Authors and Affiliations

  • John W. Griffin

There are no affiliations available

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