Frizzens of Brass, Alas

  • Edward B. Jelks

Abstract

One steamy July day, while screening shell-midden debris at a site on the Texas Gulf Coast, I plucked a small triangular arrow point chipped from green bottle glass off the screen. The year was 1948, and I was a graduate student at the University of Texas in Austin. I was visiting the dig of one of my archaeology professors, Thomas N. Campbell. The first evidence of European contact found at the site after several weeks of digging, the arrow point provoked a spirited discussion about the site’s age. Did the presence of the point prove that the site dated after first European contact with the Karankawa Indians in the early sixteenth century? Or was it possible that the point was made from a bottle which floated all the way across the Atlantic to be cast upon the Texas beach in pre-Columbian times?

Keywords

Historical Archaeology Historic Site English Colonial European Contact Indian Village 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. Duffield, Lathel F., and Edward B. Jelks, 1961, The Pearson Site. University of Texas, Department of Anthropology, Archaeology Series No. 4. Austin.Google Scholar
  2. Harper, Lloyd, Ruby Harper, R. K. Harris, Inus M. Harris, Edward B. Jelks, and J. Ned Woodall, 1966, Ornaments. In The Gilbert Site, edited by Edward B. Jelks. Bulletin of the Texas Archeological Society 37:87–104.Google Scholar
  3. Harrington, Jean C., 1952, Historic Site Archeology in the United States. In Archeology of the Eastern United States, edited by James B. Griffin. University of Chicago Press, Chicago.Google Scholar
  4. Jelks, Edward B., 1970, Documentary Evidence of Indian Occupation at the Stansbury Site (41-39B1-1). Bulletin of the Texas Archeological Society 41:277–86.Google Scholar
  5. Noëlhume, Ivor, 1969, Historical Archaeology. Alfred A. Knopf, New York.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1994

Authors and Affiliations

  • Edward B. Jelks

There are no affiliations available

Personalised recommendations