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Overview of the Radiofrequency Radiation (RFR) Bioeffects Database

  • Peter Polson
  • Louis N. Heynick
Chapter
Part of the NATO ASI Series book series (NSSA, volume 274)

Abstract

For simplicity, we have used the acronym “RFR” in our database to span the nominal frequency range from 3 kHz to 300 GHz even though that range covers both the radiofrequency and microwave regions. So far, we have not included analyses of possible bioeffects of electric and magnetic fields at powerline frequencies (50–60 Hz).

Keywords

Sham Group Squirrel Monkey Splenic Cell Exposed Mouse Microwave Exposure 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1995

Authors and Affiliations

  • Peter Polson
    • 1
    • 2
  • Louis N. Heynick
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.CupertinoUSA
  2. 2.Palo AltoUSA

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