Effects of Microwave Radiation Exposure on Behavioral Performance in Nonhuman Primates

  • John A. D’Andrea
Chapter
Part of the NATO ASI Series book series (NSSA, volume 274)

Abstract

Research conducted during the past three decades has shown that exposure of laboratory animals to radiofrequency radiation can cause a variety of behavioral changes. These changes range from subtle effects such as perception of microwave-induced sound to complete cessation of behavioral performance due to severe hyperthermia. A central theme of this research has been to determine a relationship between specific absorption rate (SAR) and adverse consequences of exposure to microwave radiation. Studies evaluating microwave exposure on the performance of well-learned opreant tasks have been the primary avenue for determining this relationship. This information provides a scientific data base from which safe exposure standards can be derived.

Keywords

Rhesus Monkey Microwave Radiation Nonhuman Primate Squirrel Monkey Behavioral Performance 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1995

Authors and Affiliations

  • John A. D’Andrea
    • 1
  1. 1.Aviation Performance DivisionNaval Aerospace Medical Research LaboratoryPensacolaUSA

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