International Commission on Non-Ionizing Radiation Protection Progress towards Radiofrequency Field Standards

  • Michael H. Repacholi
Chapter
Part of the NATO ASI Series book series (NSSA, volume 274)

Abstract

The International Commission on Non-Ionizing Radiation Protection (ICNIRP) was established in May 1992 by the International Radiation Protection Association (IRPA) as an independent scientific commission to provide advice and guidance on all aspects of protection from NIR exposure to workers, the general public and the environment. ICNIRP’s predecessor, the International Non-Ionizing Radiation Committee (INIRC) of the IRPA had developed a substantial reputation in the field of NIR protection. Its procedures for the development of standards will be continued by the ICNIRP and are described here. Current areas of concern and future activities of ICNIRP on protection from radiofrequency (RF) field exposure will also be summarized.

Keywords

Radio Frequency Radiation Protection Exposure Limit Basic Restriction Radio Frequency Field 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1995

Authors and Affiliations

  • Michael H. Repacholi
    • 1
  1. 1.Australian Radiation LaboratoryICNIRPAustralia

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