Evaluation of Reproductive Epidemiologic Studies

  • Teresa M. Schnorr
  • Barbara A. Grajewski
Chapter
Part of the NATO ASI Series book series (NSSA, volume 274)

Abstract

Concern about electromagnetic fields and reproductive effects began with clusters of adverse reproductive effects among video display terminal (VDT) operators. Because of the large number of women using VDTs and the intense public concern, most of the epidemiologic studies of electromagnetic fields and reproduction have been conducted among women using VDTs. There have also been studies of men and women exposed to other electromagnetic frequencies. This review will consider only those studies that fall within the 10 kHz–300 GHz range and so will include studies of physiotherapists, VDT operators and some radar operators.

Keywords

Electromagnetic Field Spontaneous Abortion Magnetic Field Exposure Visual Display Terminal Work Environ Health 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1995

Authors and Affiliations

  • Teresa M. Schnorr
    • 1
  • Barbara A. Grajewski
    • 1
  1. 1.Division of Surveillance, Hazard Evaluations and Field StudiesNational Institute for Occupational Safety and HealthCincinnatiUSA

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