Outpatient Treatment as an Alternative to Residential Treatment or Inpatient Hospitalization

  • Stewart Gabel

Abstract

The clinician who is faced with the need to recommend a particular treatment modality for a severely emotionally or behaviorally disturbed youngster often faces a dilemma. Severely disturbed children may benefit from intensive services in an outpatient setting or may require hospitalization or residential treatment. There are few guidelines and little research to aid the clinician in his or her informed recommendations to these youngsters and their families. Clinical impression, a useful but not infallible tool, is what is most often used in making these types of recommendations.

Keywords

Child Abuse Residential Treatment Conduct Disorder Child Psychiatry Antisocial Personality Disorder 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. American Psychiatric Association. (1980). Diagnostic and statistical manual of mental disorders (3rd ed.). Washington, DC: Author.Google Scholar
  2. Bland, R., & Orn, H. (1986). Family violence and psychiatric disorder. Canadian Journal of Psychiatry, 31, 129–137.Google Scholar
  3. Brent, D. A., Kalas, R., Edelbrock, C., Costello, A. J., Dulcan, M. K., & Conover, N. (1986). Psychopathology and its relationship to suicidal ideation in childhood and adolescence. Journal of the American Academy of Child Psychiatry, 25, 666–673.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. Gabel, S., & Finn, M. (1986). Outcome in children’s day treatment program: Review of the literature and recommendations for future research. International Journal of Partial Hospitalization, 3, 261–271.Google Scholar
  5. Gabel, S., Finn, M., & Ahmad, A. (1988). Day treatment outcome with severely disturbed children. Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, 27, 479–482.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  6. Goldfarb, W., Goldfarb, N., & Pollack, R. C. (1966). Treatment of childhood schizophrenia: A three year comparison of day and residential treatment. Archives of General Psychiatry, 14, 119–128.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  7. Hinckley, E. C., & Ellis, W. F. (1985). An effective alternative to residential placement: Home based services. Journal of Clinical Child Psychology, 14, 209–213.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  8. Kaplan, S. J., Pelcovitz, D., Salzinger, S., & Ganeles, D. (1983). Psychopathology of parents of abused and neglected children and adolescents. Journal of the American Academy of Child Psychiatry, 22, 238–244.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  9. Klar, H., Frances, A., & Clarkin, J. (1982). Selection criteria for partial hospitalization. Hospital and Community Psychiatry, 33, 929–933.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  10. Livingston, R. (1987). Sexually and physically abused children. Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, 26, 413–415.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  11. Marriage, K., Fine, S., Moretti, M., & Haley, G. (1986). Relationship between depression and conduct disorder in children and adolescents. Journal of the American Academy of Child Psychiatry, 25, 687–691.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  12. Pfeffer, C. R., Conte, H. R., Plutchik, R., & Jerrett, I. (1979). Suicidal behavior in latency-age children: An empirical study. Journal of the American Academy of Child Psychiatry, 18, 679–692.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  13. Pfeffer, C. R., Conte, H. R., Plutchik, R., & Jerrett, I. (1980). Suicidal behavior in latency-age children: An outpatient population. Journal of the American Academy of Child Psychiatry, 23, 416–423.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  14. Pfeffer, C. R., Solomon, G., Plutchik, R., Mizruchi, M. S., & Weiner, A. (1982). Suicidal behavior in latency-age psychiatric inpatients: A replication and cross validation. Journal of the American Academy of Child Psychiatry, 21, 564–569.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  15. Prentice-Dunn, S., Wilson, D. R., & Lyman, R. D. (1981). Client factors related to outcome in a residential and day treatment program for children. Journal of Clinical Child Psychology, 10, 188–191.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  16. Puig-Antich, J. (1982). Major depression and conduct disorder in pre-puberty. Journal of the American Academy of Child Psychiatry, 21, 118–128.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  17. Robins, L. N., West, P. A., & Herjanic, B. L. (1975). Arrests and delinquency in two generations: A study of black urban families and their children. Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry, 16, 125–140.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  18. Rutter, M. (1978. Family, area and school influences in the genesis of conduct disorders. In L.A. Hersov, M. Berger, & D. Shaffer (Eds.), Aggression and antisocial behavior in childhood and adolescence (pp. 95–113). New York: Pergamon Press.Google Scholar
  19. Rutter, M., & Quinton, D. (1984). Parental psychiatric disorder: Effects on children. Psychological Medicine, 14, 853–880.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  20. Smith, S. L. (1984). Significant research findings in the etiology of child abuse. Social Casework: The Journal of Contemporary Social Work, 65, 337–346.Google Scholar
  21. Thompson, C. M. (1985). Characteristics associated with outcome in a community mental health partial hospitalization program. Community and Mental Health Journal, 21, 179–188.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  22. Winsberg, B. G., Bialer, I., Kupietz, S., Botti, E., & Balka, E. G. (1980). Home vs. hospital care of children with behavior disorders: A controlled investigation. Archives of General Psychiatry, 37, 413–418.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  23. Zimet, S. G., & Farley, G. K. (1985). Day treatment for children in the United States. Journal of the American Academy of Child Psychiatry, 24, 732–738.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1989

Authors and Affiliations

  • Stewart Gabel
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Psychiatry, Westchester DivisionCornell University Medical College, The New York Hospital-Cornell Medical CenterWhite PlainsUSA

Personalised recommendations