Advertisement

Mentally Retarded Children and Adolescents

  • Edward A. KonarskiJr.

Abstract

Until recently, residential placement had long been the treatment of choice for mentally retarded children and adolescents. This approach has changed over the last 20 years, however, as many professionals and parents have become strong advocates of home treatment for this population. The present chapter will discuss the alternative of residential treatment for the mentally retarded. The discussion will begin by examining the definition of mental retardation and its implications for treatment. Next, the history of residential treatment and current influences on its role will be examined. Finally, key components for providing effective residential treatment will be elaborated.

Keywords

Mental Retardation Adaptive Behavior Residential Care Residential Treatment Restrictive Setting 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. American Association on Mental Deficiency. (1983). Classification in mental retardation. Washington, DC: American Association on Mental Deficiency.Google Scholar
  2. Bijou, S. W. (1966). A functional analysis of retarded development. In N. R. Ellis (Ed.), International Review of Research in Mental Retardation (Vol. 1, pp. 1–19). New York: Academic Press.Google Scholar
  3. Braddock, D., & Fujiura, G. (1987). State government financial effort in mental retardation. American Journal of Mental Deficiency, 91, 450–459.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  4. Czyzewski, M. J., Christian, W. P., & Norris, M. B. (1984. Preparing the family for client transition: Outreach parent training. In W. P. Christian, G. T. Hannah, & T. J. Glahn (Eds.), Programming effective human services: Strategies for institutional change and client transition (pp. 177–202). New York: Plenum Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. Favell, J. E., Favell, J. E., Riddle, J. I., & Risley, T. R. (1984. Promoting change in mental retardation facilities: Getting services from the paper to the people. In W. P. Christian, G. T. Hannah, & T. J. Glahn (Eds.), Programming effective human services: Strategies for institutional change and client transition (pp. 15–37). New York: Plenum Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  6. Favell, J. E., & Phillips, J. F. (1986. Behavior therapy in residential programs for retarded persons. In F. J. Fuoco & W. P. Christian (Eds.), Behavior analysis and therapy in residential programs (pp. 260–279). New York: Van Nostrand Reinhold Co.Google Scholar
  7. Jones, M. L., Favell, J. E., & Risley, T. R. (1983. Socioecological programming of the mentally retarded. In J. L. Matson & F. Andrasik (Eds.), Treatment issues and innovations in mental retardation (pp. 373–413). New York: Plenum Press.Google Scholar
  8. Konarski, E. A., Jr., & Spruill, J. (1987. Theoretical approaches to assessment and treatment. In C. L. Frame & J. L. Matson (Eds.), Handbook of assessment in childhood psychopathology: Applied issues in differential diagnosis and treatment evaluation (pp. 13–32). New York: Plenum Press.Google Scholar
  9. Luce, S. C., Anderson, S. R., Thibadeau, S. F., & Lipsker, L. E. (1984. Preparing the client for transition to the community. In W. P. Christian, G. T. Hannah, & T. J. Glahn (Eds.), Programming effective human services: Strategies for institutional change and client transition (pp. 157–176). New York: Plenum Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  10. McCarver, R. B., & Cavalier, A. R. (1983. Philosophical concepts and attitudes underlying programming for the mentally retarded. In J. L. Matson & F. Andrasik (Eds.), Treatment issues and innovations in mental retardation (pp. 1–36). New York: Plenum Press.Google Scholar
  11. New York State Association for Retarded Children v. Carey, 393F. Supp. 715 (E.D.N.Y. 1975), 357F. Supp. 752 (E.D.N.Y. 1973).Google Scholar
  12. Paul, G. L. (1986). Assessment in residential treatment settings: Principles and methods to support cost-effective quality operations. Champaign, IL: Research Press.Google Scholar
  13. Paul, G. L., Mariotto, M. J., & Redfield, J. P. (1986. Assessment purposes, domains, and utility for decision making. In G. L. Paul (Ed.), Assessment in residential treatment setting: Principles and methods to support cost-effective quality operations (pp. 1–25). Champaign, IL: Research Press.Google Scholar
  14. Reid, D. H., & Shoemaker, J. (1984. Behavioral supervision: Methods of improving institutional staff performance. In W. P. Christian, G. T. Hannah, & T. J. Glahn (Eds.), Programming effective human services: Strategies for institutional change and client transition (pp. 39–61). New York: Plenum Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  15. Reid, D. H., & Whitman, T. L. (1983). Behavioral staff management in institutions: A critical review of effectiveness and acceptability. Analysis and Intervention in Developmental Disabilities, 3, 131–149.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  16. Scheerenberger, R. C. (1975). Managing residential facilities for the developmentally disabled. Springfield, IL: Charles C. Thomas, Pub.Google Scholar
  17. Scheerenberger, R. C. (1983). A history of mental retardation. Baltimore, MD: Paul H. Brookes Publishing Co.Google Scholar
  18. Stokes, T. F., & Baer, D. M. (1977). An implicit technology of generalization. Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis, 10, 349–367.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  19. Thaw, J. (1986. Creating future responsive residential facilities: A perspective in the process of applying reform. In J. Thaw & A. Cuvo (Eds.), Developing responsive human services: New perspectives about residential treatment organizations (pp. 1–50). Hillsdale, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates, Inc.Google Scholar
  20. Wolfensberger, W. (1972). The principle of normalization in human services. Ontario: National Institute on Mental Retardation.Google Scholar
  21. Wyatt v. Stickney, 325F. Supp. 781 (M.D. Ala., 1971), 334F. Supp. 1341 (M.D. Ala. 1971), 344F. Supp. 373, 387 (M.D. Ala. 1972)) aff’d in part, modified in part sub nom., Wyatt v. Anderholt, 503F. 2d. 1305 (5th Cir. 1974).Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1989

Authors and Affiliations

  • Edward A. KonarskiJr.
    • 1
  1. 1.Program AdministrationWestern Carolina CenterMorgantonUSA

Personalised recommendations