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The Influence of Pornography on Sexual Crimes

  • Mary R. Murrin
  • D. R. Laws
Part of the Applied Clinical Psychology book series (NSSB)

Abstract

There are several approaches to the study of the role of pornography in the etiology and maintenance of sexual crimes. One may (1) study the correlation between pornography consumption in the general population and the incidence of sexual crimes, (2) examine this relationship cross-culturally, (3) examine the effect of these materials on normals in the laboratory, (4) examine the effects of these materials on sex offenders, or (5) attempt a synthesis of this research through a comparative study of the similarities and differences between sex offenders and other males. The simple approach is to draw a sample of sex offenders and ask them about their pornography consumption. All of these approaches have basic flaws, but each contributes to the complete picture.

Keywords

Sexual Arousal Interpersonal Violence Sexual Aggression Sexual Stimulus Rape Myth 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1990

Authors and Affiliations

  • Mary R. Murrin
    • 1
  • D. R. Laws
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Law and Mental Health, Florida Mental Health InstituteUniversity of South FloridaTampaUSA

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