Sexual Aggression

Achieving Power through Humiliation
  • Juliet L. Darke
Part of the Applied Clinical Psychology book series (NSSB)

Abstract

In recent years a shift in the focus of both theoretical and research issues concerning sexual violence has been observed in the scientific community. This changed emphasis can be linked to the resurgence of the feminist movement and to the early writings of women such as Brownmiller (1975) who forced us to view rape in cultural, political, and historical contexts. With the benefit of a sociopolitical framework, a growing awareness of the nonsexual needs served by sexual assault and a redefinition of sexual assault as an assaultive act with sexual components have been evident.

Keywords

Sexual Assault Sexual Violence Sexual Arousal Apply Behavior Analysis Sexual Aggression 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1990

Authors and Affiliations

  • Juliet L. Darke
    • 1
  1. 1.Correctional Service Canada, Prison for WomenKingstonCanada

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