Outcome of Comprehensive Cognitive-Behavioral Treatment Programs

  • W. L. Marshall
  • H. E. Barbaree
Part of the Applied Clinical Psychology book series (NSSB)

Abstract

A great variety of treatment programs for sex offenders are now available (Brecher, 1978; Hults, 1981; Knopp, 1984). Evaluations of the outcome from nonbehavioral psychotherapy programs (Barbaree & Marshall, in press-a) reveal that methodological problems present difficulties in determining effectiveness. While those programs appear to consistently result in recidivism rates around or below 10% (Furby, Weinrott, and Blackshaw, 1989), this apparent effectiveness is seriously confounded by selection procedures which exclude the most dangerous offenders from treatment (Barbaree & Marshall, in press-a) and by the failure to provide an adequate comparison group of untreated offenders (Furby et al., 1989; Tracy, Donnelly, Morgenbesser, & Macdonald, 1983). The effectiveness of physical treatment procedures has been evaluated by Bradford (1985; and Chapter 17, this volume), who comes to optimistic conclusions contrary to the views expressed by us in our reviews of this literature (Barbaree & Marshall, in press-a; Quinsey & Marshall, 1983).

Keywords

Recidivism Rate Child Molester Deviant Stimulus Sexual Abuser Offensive Behavior 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1990

Authors and Affiliations

  • W. L. Marshall
    • 1
  • H. E. Barbaree
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of PsychologyQueen’s UniversityKingstonCanada

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