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The Enhancement of Social Skills

An Information-Processing Analysis
  • Richard M. McFall
Part of the Applied Clinical Psychology book series (NSSB)

Abstract

Social-skills training is one of the more commonly prescribed treatments for rapists, pedophiles, and other sex offenders (Abel, Blanchard, & Becker, 1976, 1978; Barlow, Abel, Blanchard, Bristow, & Young, 1977; Becker, Abel, Blanchard, Murphy, & Coleman, 1978; Cohen, Seghorn, & Calmas, 1969; Crawford & Allen, 1979; Marshall & McKnight, 1975; Whitman & Quinsey, 1981). Nevertheless, recent reviews of the literature (Earls & Quinsey, 1985; Hollon & Trower, 1986; Stermac, Segal, & Gillis, Chapter 9, this volume) have concluded that social-skills training is not based on a solid foundation of coherent theory; that it does not consist of explicit and replicable techniques; that it is plagued by serious conceptual, methodological, and measurement problems; and that it is not yet supported by compelling evidence of treatment efficacy. It is not even clear that sex offenders are any less socially skilled than control subjects (Stermac & Quinsey, 1986). In short, the popular use of social-skills training with sex offenders seems to be based largely on the intuitive appeal of the idea and on the implicit faith of the proponents. At best, social-skills training must be considered an approach that has not yet fulfilled its promise.

Keywords

Social Skill Social Competence Sexual Arousal Sexual Aggression Rape Myth 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1990

Authors and Affiliations

  • Richard M. McFall
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of PsychologyIndiana UniversityBloomingtonUSA

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