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A Comparison of Enterprise Management in Japan and the People’s Republic of China

  • Dexter Dunphy
  • Jeannette Shi

Abstract

Japanese enterprises have attracted much scholarly and popular attention in recent years. Japanese management, in particular, has been seen as a test case for the possibility that there may be other management philosophies as effective as, or more effective than U.S. management philosophy, particularly when managing in non-U.S. cultural contexts. More broadly still, Japanese management practices have been seen as a challenge, not just to U.S. management theories, but to Western management philosophy as a whole. It is this management philosophy that has dominated most management schools throughout the world since their inception.

Keywords

Power Distance East Asian Country Uncertainty Avoidance Enterprise Management Work Participation 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1989

Authors and Affiliations

  • Dexter Dunphy
    • 1
  • Jeannette Shi
    • 1
  1. 1.Australian Graduate School of Management, University of New South WalesKensingtonAustralia

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