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Implications of Defining Literacy as a Major Goal of Teaching the Mother Tongue in a Multicultural Society

The Dutch Situation
  • Sjaak Kroon
  • Jan Sturm
Part of the Topics in Language and Linguistics book series (TLLI)

Abstract

In the February 1985 issue of College English, published by the American National Council of Teachers of English as a forum for discussion of the teaching of English and the content of language arts programs, Deborah Brandt presents a review article which is—at least in our opinion—rather strikingly entitled Versions of Literacy (Brandt, 1985). The use of that caption seems to suggest a somewhat provocative perspective on the perilous problem of becoming literate in modem, that is to say, Western societies, mainly characterizable as plurilingual and multicultural.

Keywords

Mother Tongue Language Teaching Minority Language Immigrant Child Home Language 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1989

Authors and Affiliations

  • Sjaak Kroon
    • 1
  • Jan Sturm
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Language and LiteratureTilburg UniversityTilburgThe Netherlands
  2. 2.Dutch DepartmentNijmegen UniversityNijmegenThe Netherlands

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