Definition and Assessment of Coronary-Prone Behavior

  • Theodore M. Dembroski
  • Redford B. Williams
Part of the The Springer Series in Behavioral Psychophysiology and Medicine book series (SSBP)

Abstract

Any consideration of assessment issues regarding coronary-prone behavior must begin with a review and evaluation of the evidence that certain psychological/behavioral constructs are “coronary-prone,” i. e., that certain psychological/behavioral characteristics are associated with and/or predictive of such manifestations of coronary heart disease (CHD) as myocardial infarction, cardiac death, angina, and coronary atherosclerosis (coronary artery disease, CAD). On the basis of such evidence it will be possible to draw conclusions regarding the best available means of assessing coronary-prone characteristics, as well as what further research is needed to improve our ability to assess such characteristics.

Keywords

Coronary Heart Disease Event Coronary Artery Disease Severity Multiple Risk Factor Intervention Trial Jenkins Activity Survey Clinical Coronary Heart Disease 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1989

Authors and Affiliations

  • Theodore M. Dembroski
    • 1
  • Redford B. Williams
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of PsychologyUniversity of Maryland Baltimore CountyCatonsvilleUSA
  2. 2.Department of PsychiatryDuke University Medical CenterDurhamUSA

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