Variation and Convergence in Nonnative Institutionalized Englishes

  • Jessica Williams
Part of the Topics in Language and Linguistics book series (TLLI)

Abstract

The study of language variation within second-language acquisition research generally includes variation across learners as well as within the production of a single learner. An area which is less often addressed is the variation which is found across nonnative institutional varieties. It is important that this be done both because of the huge numbers of people who speak these nonnative varieties and because of the wide-ranging implications that this area of research has for the study of second-language acquisition in general. A number of descriptive studies of nonnative institutionalized varieties of English (NIVEs) have been reported (Bailey & Görlach, 1982; Görlach, 1984; Kachru, 1982b; Lowenberg, 1986; Platt, Weber, & Ho, 1984; Smith, 1981; Williams, 1987a).

Keywords

Native Speaker Word Order Language Acquisition Declarative Sentence Sentence Production 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1989

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jessica Williams
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of LinguisticsUniversity of Illinois at ChicagoChicagoUSA

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