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The Social Dynamics of Native and Nonnative Variation in Complimenting Behavior

  • Nessa Wolfson
Part of the Topics in Language and Linguistics book series (TLLI)

Abstract

Over the past decade, sociolinguistics has come to have an increasing impact on the field of TESOL (Teachers of English to Speakers of Other Languages). To a great extent, this development has been due to the realization that second-language acquisition is, in fact, the acquisition of what Dell Hymes has called communicative competence. That is, becoming an effective speaker of a new language not only involves learning new vocabulary in addition to rules of pronunciation and grammar, but must also include the ability to use these linguistic resources in ways that are socially appropriate among speakers of the target language.

Keywords

Native Speaker Social Distance Target Language Communicative Competence Nonnative Speaker 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1989

Authors and Affiliations

  • Nessa Wolfson
    • 1
  1. 1.Graduate School of EducationUniversity of PennsylvaniaPhiladelphiaUSA

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