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The Vietnam Veteran

  • Benjamin Bursten

Abstract

Vietnam veterans must be distinguished from Vietnam era veterans. Vietnam era veterans are those who served in the armed forces of the United States during the period of the Vietnam conflict. Although this group includes those who served in Vietnam itself, it also includes those who never left the United States or who served in other geographical areas. Like any unselected group of veterans from any era, this group can suffer a wide variety of psychiatric illnesses, from the anxieties and somatoform disorders to the personality disorders to the mood and thought disorders. Hearst, Newman, and Helley (1986) reported that having served in the armed forces during the Vietnam era increases the likelihood of suicide by 65% and the likelihood of dying in a motor vehicle accident by 49%.

Keywords

Stress Disorder Personality Disorder Community Psychiatry Vietnam Veteran Combat Veteran 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1990

Authors and Affiliations

  • Benjamin Bursten
    • 1
  1. 1.Oak RidgeUSA

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