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Borderline Disorders

  • Paul H. Soloff

Abstract

The diagnosis of borderline disorder is among the most controversial in modern psychiatry. It is a concept whose origins extend into the last century; yet it has only recently achieved official status as a psychiatric disorder in the third edition of the American Psychiatric Association’s Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (APA, 1980) (DSM-III). Controversy continues over the reliability and validity of the construct and the criteria used to define it. Despite the academic debate, the popularity of the clinical concept continues to grow. Estimates of the prevalence of the borderline diagnosis range from 7.8% of admissions to the psychiatric ward of a general teaching hospital (Mack, 1975) to 25% of admissions to a psychoanalytic psychiatric institute (Andrulonis, Glueck, Stroebel, Vogel, Shapiro, & Aldridge, 1981).

Keywords

Personality Disorder Borderline Personality Disorder Attention Deficit Disorder Paranoid Ideation Psychotic Experience 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1990

Authors and Affiliations

  • Paul H. Soloff
    • 1
  1. 1.Western Psychiatric Institute and ClinicUniversity of PittsburghPittsburghUSA

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