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Sexual Dysfunction

  • Kathryn S. K. Hall
  • Sandra R. Leiblum

Abstract

Browse through any bookstore today and you will see books and magazine articles devoted to the description of how to, when to, why to, who to, and what to do in relation to sex. Sexual activity is probably one of Western society’s leading recreational pastimes. Consequently, there is pressure on people to become “good” at sex, just as one might strive to be a good golfer or tennis player. Despite the proliferation of gourmet guides to “good sex,” recent studies have highlighted the fact that many people are dissatisfied with their sexual functioning.

Keywords

Erectile Dysfunction Sexual Dysfunction Sexual Desire Sexual Arousal Sexual Problem 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1990

Authors and Affiliations

  • Kathryn S. K. Hall
    • 1
  • Sandra R. Leiblum
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of PsychiatryUMDNJ-Robert Wood Johnson Medical SchoolPiscatawayUSA

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