Assessment of Prevention Efforts: A Focus on Alcohol-Related Community Damage

  • Richard M. Earle

Abstract

Since 1970 and the passage of a national alcoholism law (PL 91-616) and the creation of the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (NIAAA) there has been a flurry of research activity and program development concerned with the prevention of alcohol-related problems (USDHEW, 1971, 1974, 1978, 1981). However, the question of how to measure the incidence of alcoholism and alcohol abuse in a given community has been a serious omission among published reports in the field (Staulcup, Kenward, and Frigo, 1979). Selden Bacon, an internationally recognized expert in studies on alcohol, writes that for “the past 78 years there have been many claims for prevention programs but few people can think of even one such attempt which can provide the slightest evidence that such a prevention in fact incurred” (Bacon, 1978, p. 1143).

Keywords

Alcohol Abuse Social Indicator Alcohol Problem Alcoholic Anonymous Employee Assistance Program 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1989

Authors and Affiliations

  • Richard M. Earle
    • 1
  1. 1.University of EvansvilleEvansvilleUSA

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