Advertisement

Stages in the Multifaceted Treatment of the Multiproblem Drug Abuser

  • Sam Lison
  • Ruti Saenger
  • Ilana Vinder

Abstract

Professionals and the public at large have continued to report and believe that drug abusers are both difficult to treat and to treat successfully (Brecher, 1972; Brill and Lieberman, 1972; Sells, 1974). Neither the medical model, which is considered by some to exacerbate the problem (Cummings, 1979), nor traditional psychotherapy, which too narrowly embraces the diversity of problems associated with drug abuse (Hughes, 1977), have been reported as being effective. The few optimistic reports of treatment success have often been obtained by the use of idiosyncratic methods (Cummings, 1979). This situation has necessitated the development of a broadly applicable, multifaceted approach to the problem as recommended by Glatt (1974) and which has recently been reported as existing in greater numbers (Steer, 1979). That is, several programs now exist where a wide range of coordinated therapeutic interventions are applied over a period of time by a network of professionals in various settings and agencies. The caseworker or therapist from the primary drug-treatment facility is responsible for the treatment program. What has been lacking in this approach, though, is a coherent description of the multifaceted therapeutic process. This paper presents such a description based on the authors’ experience at the Jerusalem Center for Drug Misuse Intervention.

Keywords

Drug Abuse Treatment Methadone Maintenance Multifaceted Treatment Life Area Positive Resolution 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. Brecher, E. M. Licit and Illicit Drugs. Boston: Little, Brown Co., 1972. Brill, L., Lieberman, L. (eds.) Major Modalities in the Treatment of Drug Abuse. New York: Behavioral Publications, 1972.Google Scholar
  2. Cummings, N. A. “Turning bread into stones: our modern antimiracle. American Psychologist, 34 (12), 1119–1129, 1979.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. Einstein, S. Annual Report: Jerusalem Center for Drug Misuse Intervention. Jerusalem, 1981 ( Hebrew).Google Scholar
  4. Glass, M. M. A Guide to Addiction and its Treatment. Lancaster, England: Medical and Technical Publishing, 1974.Google Scholar
  5. Hughes, P. H. Behind the Wall of Respect. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1977.Google Scholar
  6. Sells, S. B. The Effectiveness of Drug Abuse Treatment, Vol. 1. Cambridge, Mass.: Ballinger Publications, 1974.Google Scholar
  7. Steer, R. A. “Differences in heroin addicts seeking inpatient detoxification, ambulatory detoxification, or methadone maintenance.” Drug and Alcohol Dependence, 4, 399–406, 1979.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1989

Authors and Affiliations

  • Sam Lison
    • 1
  • Ruti Saenger
    • 1
  • Ilana Vinder
    • 1
  1. 1.Ezrath Nashim in Derech Beit LechemJerusalem Center for Drug Misuse InformationJerusalemIsrael

Personalised recommendations