Abstract

Research is a painfully slow process, but from time to time there is a breathtaking acceleration. After many years of experimentation we have suddenly found a window through which we can glimpse a new view of autism. This new view is little explored as yet, but it has come to be known by the catch phrase “theory of mind”. Finding the window was not sheer luck however. We were led towards it by a number of converging paths.

Keywords

Mental State Autistic Child Pretend Play False Belief Task Autistic Individual 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1989

Authors and Affiliations

  • Uta Frith

There are no affiliations available

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