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Abstract

The problems of diagnosing autism will be discussed in the light of historical attempts to define specific syndromes and the difficulty of differentiating autism from other similar conditions. The story of the development of the concepts of the triad of social impairments and the autistic continuum will be outlined. An approach to diagnosis based on these concepts and its relevance to clinical practice and research will be described. In this chapter, diagnosis will refer to recognition of patterns of behaviour and psychological impairments, and will not be concerned with any underlying aetiology.

Keywords

Autistic Child Social Impairment Pretend Play Impaired Child Repetitive Activity 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1989

Authors and Affiliations

  • Lorna Wing

There are no affiliations available

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