Educational Evaluation

  • Margaret D. Lansing

Abstract

Educational evaluation is an essential step in planning optimal treatment for the autistic child. It has been frequently stated (Rutter, 1978, Lansing & Schopler, 1978; Wing, 1976) that education is the treatment of choice for this population. Due to the idiosyncratic needs of an autistic child, an appropriate educational plan must be based on a broad evaluation that includes three essential areas: 1. CONTENT; An assessment of the skills and concepts already acquired and those the child shows a readiness to learn; 2. BEHAVIOR; The autistic behaviors and deficits that must be understood; 3. TECHNIQUES; The teaching techniques that will improve attention, motivation, and learning. The assessment of these three areas will form the basis for specific individualized recommendations that result from this educational evaluation. In order to illustrate the value of this type of broad evaluation, I will be describing it in the context of our TEACCH evaluation using the Psychoeducational Profile (PEP-R) (Schopler et al., in press).

Keywords

Test Item Function Area Receptive Language Verbal Direction Uneven Development 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1989

Authors and Affiliations

  • Margaret D. Lansing

There are no affiliations available

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