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Urolithiasis pp 155-157 | Cite as

Combined Influence of Urinary Calcium and Oxalate Concentrations on Crystal Formation in Stone Formers

  • M. Daudon
  • R. J. Réveillaud
  • H. Levasseur
  • P. Jungers

Abstract

The respective influence of calcium (Ca) and oxalate (Ox) concentrations in urine as risk factors for the formation of CaOx calculi and crystal in Ca stone disease is still debated (1). Although a high Ca concentration contributes to CaOx supersaturation (2), recent studies have shown that variations in Ox concentration (3, 4) induce greater effects on CaOx supersaturation and in the number and size of CaOx crystals (5). However, even in studies involving quantitative assessment of CaOx crystalluria (6), no attempt was made to identify the two crystalline phases of CaOx, that is, monohydrate or whewellite (Wh) and dihydrate or weddellite (Wd). As our previous studies had shown that stones preponderantly made of Wh are mainly associated with a high-Ox urine concentration, and those made of Wd with hypercalciuria (7), we prospectively assessed the incidence of crystalluria and the type of CaOx crystals in Ca stone formers with respect to both Ca and Ox concentration in the urine.

Keywords

Calcium Oxalate CaOx Crystal Calcium Stone Disease Calcium Oxalate Stone Disease Idiopathic Calcium Stone 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1989

Authors and Affiliations

  • M. Daudon
    • 1
    • 2
  • R. J. Réveillaud
    • 1
    • 2
  • H. Levasseur
    • 1
    • 2
  • P. Jungers
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.Laboratoire CristalSaint-Cloud HospitalParisFrance
  2. 2.Department of NephrologyNecker HospitalParisFrance

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