Urolithiasis pp 101-104 | Cite as

Glycosaminoglycans as Inhibitors of Renal Stone Formation

  • B. G. Danielson
  • B. Fellström
  • B. Wikström

Abstract

Renal stone formation is basically a consequence of an imbalance between supersaturation of the urine and the inhibition of crystal formation and growth. Urine contains many substances which are claimed to modify the rate of crystallization of calcium oxalate (1). Inhibitors act on crystal formation through one or two possible mechanisms. Firstly, they may act by complexing either calcium or oxalate ions, thereby reducing the level of calcium-oxalate supersaturation in the crystallizing solution. All of the urinary inhibitors, citrate, and magnesium fall into this group. The other group of inhibitors acts at relatively low concentrations by adsorbing to the surface of the crystals, thereby retarding the rate of crystal growth and agglomeration. Among this group could be mentioned pyrophosphate, heparinoids or glycosaminoglycans (GAGS) like chondroitin sulphate, heparin, heparane sulphate, and dermatan sulphate, RNA-like material, and Tamm-Horsfall mucopolysaccharide.

Keywords

Heparane Sulphate Chondroitin Sulphate Stone Disease Dermatan Sulphate Renal Stone Formation 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

  1. 1.
    WG Robertson, H Hughes, SA Barkworth, and VR Walker, Competition between the known inhibitors and promoters of calcium oxalate crystallization in urine, in: “Inhibitors of Crystallization in Renal Lithiasis and their Clinical Application,” A Martelli, P Buli, and B Marchesini, eds., Acta Medica, Bologna (1988).Google Scholar
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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1989

Authors and Affiliations

  • B. G. Danielson
    • 1
  • B. Fellström
    • 1
  • B. Wikström
    • 1
  1. 1.Renal Section, Department of Internal MedicineUniversity HospitalUppsalaSweden

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