Urolithiasis pp 637-640 | Cite as

Biochemical and Clinical Studies After Parathyroidectomy in Primary Hyperparathyroidism

  • A. Fabris
  • V. Ortalda
  • A. D’Angelo
  • S. Giannini
  • G. Maschio

Abstract

The clinical course of patients after successful parathyroidectomy (PTX) for primary hyperparathyroidism is not as yet fully understood. There still exists a controversy regarding the effect of some persistent endocrine disorders (for example, abnormalities with vitamin D), the recurrence rate of nephrolithiasis, and the possible changes in renal function. We report the clinical and biochemical follow-up of 56 patients with primary hyperparathyroidism complicated with recurrent calcium nephrolithiasis. These patients had no evidence of recurrent renal stones after surgery, nor did they have hypercalcemia or bone lesions. Furthermore, all of them had normal renal function (1–4).

Keywords

Primary Hyperparathyroidism Urinary Calcium Urinary Calcium Excretion Absorptive Hypercalciuria Successful Parathyroidectomy 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1989

Authors and Affiliations

  • A. Fabris
    • 1
  • V. Ortalda
    • 1
  • A. D’Angelo
    • 2
  • S. Giannini
    • 2
  • G. Maschio
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of NephrologyVeronaItaly
  2. 2.The Istituto di Medicina InternaUniversity of PadovaPadovaItaly

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