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Urolithiasis pp 411-415 | Cite as

Plasma Oxalate and its Diurnal Variation and Renal Clearance

  • G. A. Rose

Abstract

Plasma oxalate has been very difficult to measure until quite recently. First, it is now clear that the true level of normal plasma oxalate is about 1–3 μmol/l (1). When higher levels have been reported by some chemical methods, this has been due to oxalogenesis from ascorbate (1) and perhaps by other substances as well (2). Analysis in the micromolar range presents considerable problems. Second, the precision for measurement of urinary oxalate in the millimolar range is very poor (3), and it is likely to be even worse in the micromolar range. Yet, without reliable, precise, and accurate values for plasma oxalate, it is impossible to have reliable calculations of renal clearance of plasma oxalate. However, a recentlypublished continuous-flow method (1) seemed to offer the possibility of a precise and accurate measurement of normal plasma-oxalate levels. We have, therefore, used this method to study diurnal variations of plasma oxalate and the renal clearance of oxalate.

Keywords

Renal Clearance Plasma Creatinine Micromolar Range Urinary Oxalate Primary Hyperoxaluria 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1989

Authors and Affiliations

  • G. A. Rose
    • 1
  1. 1.St. Peter’s Hospital and Institute of UrologyLondonUK

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