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Myeloprotective Effects of Interleukin-1 Following Exposure to Chemoradiotherapy

  • Joseph Laver
  • Alfred Gillio
  • Miguel Abboud
  • Cristina Gasparetto
  • David Warren
  • Richard J. O’Reilly
  • Malcolm A. S. Moore

Abstract

Interleukin-1 (IL-1), a cytokine with multiple immunological and inflammatory functions, has recently been demonstrated to play a role in hematopoietic regulation.1 Although IL-1 alone does not stimulate hematopoietic colony growth, it is synergistic with other growth factors and has been shown to be identical to hematopoietin-1.2 In addition to having a direct effect on early hematopoietic progenitors, IL-1 is capable of inducing production of various colony-stimulating factors (CSF’s) by accessory cell populations in the hematopoietic tissue.3 Administering IL-1 to mice pretreated with chemotherapy accelerated hematopoietic recovery and reduced the nadir in neutrophil count.4 Administering IL-1 to mice before or shortly after lethal irradiation protected them from severe neutropenia and subsequent death from septicemia.5,6 These results suggest that IL-1 induces a chain of events that probably affects the radiosensitivity of early hematopoietic progenitors.7 The effects of IL-1 on hematopoietic recovery after chemotherapy, together with IL-1’s radioprotective effect, indicate that this cytokine might have therapeutic potential when given either alone or in combination with other CSF’s in the treatment of chemoradiotherapy-induced myelosuppression. In contrast to stimulating blood-forming cells, IL-1 may induce endogenous production of hematopoietic inhibitors, including various prostaglandins, tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα), and interferon-gamma.8,9 Thus, the in vivo hematopoietic effects of IL-1 depend on the balance between its stimulatory and inhibitory activities.

Keywords

Hematopoietic Progenitor Hematopoietic Growth Factor Neutrophil Recovery Radioprotective Effect Hematopoietic Recovery 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1990

Authors and Affiliations

  • Joseph Laver
    • 1
  • Alfred Gillio
    • 1
  • Miguel Abboud
    • 1
  • Cristina Gasparetto
    • 1
  • David Warren
    • 1
  • Richard J. O’Reilly
    • 1
  • Malcolm A. S. Moore
    • 1
  1. 1.Bone Marrow Transplantation Service, and The James Ewing Laboratory of Developmental HematopoiesisMemorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer CenterNew YorkUSA

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