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Total-Body Irradiation in Bone Marrow Transplantation

  • Rainer Storb
  • Frederick R. Appelbaum
  • Friedrich G. Schuening
  • Robert Raff
  • Theodore Graham
  • H. Joachim Deeg

Abstract

The exquisite sensitivity of lymphohematopoietic tissues to ionizing radiation has been known since shortly after the discovery of x rays by Roentgen. The most prominent features of the hematopoietic syndrome in experimental animals are hemorrhagic complications and susceptibility to infections. Since the late 1940’s it has been known that the hematopoietic radiation injury could be modified by subsequent infusion of bone marrow. By the mid-1950’s, three independent groups of investigators showed that the lifesaving effect of marrow infusions was due to the presence of pluripotent stem cells in the transplant, from which regrowth of the damaged hematopoietic system occurred.

Keywords

Total Body Irradiation Hematopoietic Growth Factor Marrow Graft Hematopoietic Recovery Radiation Accident 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1990

Authors and Affiliations

  • Rainer Storb
    • 1
    • 4
  • Frederick R. Appelbaum
    • 1
    • 4
  • Friedrich G. Schuening
    • 2
  • Robert Raff
    • 2
  • Theodore Graham
    • 2
  • H. Joachim Deeg
    • 3
  1. 1.Clinical Research DivisionFred Hutchinson Cancer Research CenterSeattleUSA
  2. 2.University of Washington School of MedicineSeattleUSA
  3. 3.Clinical Research DivisionFred Hutchinson Cancer Research CenterSeattleUSA
  4. 4.University of British Columbia and Vancouver General HospitalVancouverUK

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