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Self-Handicapping from A Heiderian Perspective

Taking Stock of “Bonds”
  • Raymond L. Higgins
  • C. R. Snyder
Part of the The Springer Series in Social / Clinical Psychology book series (SSSC)

Abstract

To begin this book, Higgins outlined a historical perspective that emphasized the manner in which previous Adlerian views of safeguarding behavior have contributed to contemporary thinking about self-handicapping. In closing, we return to this historical theme by calling upon another older vantage point to enhance our understanding of self-handicapping. This time, however, we refer not to the thoughts of Alfred Adler, but to the insights of Fritz Heider.

Keywords

Taking Stock Unit Relation Test Anxiety Causal Attribution Balance Theory 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1990

Authors and Affiliations

  • Raymond L. Higgins
    • 1
  • C. R. Snyder
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of PsychologyUniversity of KansasLawrenceUSA

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