The Maintenance and Treatment of Self-Handicapping

From Risk-Taking to Face-Saving—and Back
  • Raymond L. Higgins
  • Steven Berglas
Part of the The Springer Series in Social / Clinical Psychology book series (SSSC)

Abstract

Arms akimbo and legs crossed, Mary sat on the floor staring blankly at the instructions spread before her. Just how the hell was she supposed to make sense of such gibberish, anyway! Barely attending to the directions for assembling her new bookcase, Mary was preoccupied with thoughts about her “damned mental block” for mechanical tasks. Finally, in mounting frustration, and without even unpacking the individual parts, she fled down the hall to the apartment of a male acquaintance for help.

Keywords

Personality Disorder Causal Attribution Child Molester Social Psychology Bulletin Wife Abuse 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1990

Authors and Affiliations

  • Raymond L. Higgins
    • 2
  • Steven Berglas
    • 1
  1. 1.McLean HospitalHarvard Medical SchoolBelmontUSA
  2. 2.Department of PsychologyUniversity of KansasLawrenceUSA

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