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Stimulus Equivalence and Cross-Modal Perception: A Testable Model for Demonstrating Symbolic Representations in Bottlenose Dolphins

  • Ronald J. Schusterman
Part of the NATO ASI Series book series (NSSA, volume 196)

Abstract

Dolphins make a variety of decisions while swimming in schools. These decisions determine the way they navigate, avoid predation, forage, reproduce, care for young and otherwise engage in social interactions. These decisions are based on the ability of dolphins to process information from a variety of sensory avenues, including the active process of investigating objects via echolocation. Information from all sensory systems is most probably used in an integrated fashion. However, whether information from the various sensory modalities is also stored and retrieved, as well as used in an integrated way, i.e., whether dolphins are capable of intermodal stimulus equivalence or cross-modal perception, currently remains a hypothesis (Schusterman, 1988a).

Keywords

Comparison Stimulus Bottlenose Dolphin Alarm Call Conditional Discrimination Conditional Relation 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1990

Authors and Affiliations

  • Ronald J. Schusterman
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.Long Marine LaboratoryUniversity of CaliforniaSanta CruzUSA
  2. 2.Department of PsychologyCalifornia State UniversityHaywardUSA

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