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Non-Acoustic Communication in Small Cetaceans: Glance, Touch, Position, Gesture, and Bubbles

  • Karen W. Pryor
Part of the NATO ASI Series book series (NSSA, volume 196)

Abstract

Behavior enables an animal to interact with and survive in its environment. In cetaceans, as in all other animals, sensory systems exist to serve behavior. Perhaps more than most animals, cetaceans may be said to live in two worlds: their physical universe of air and water, and the social universe of the other dolphins around them. Their sensory systems serve them in both. In the physical universe, sensory systems are used in locomotion, foraging, maintaining physical and physiological equilibrium, and so on. In the social universe, sensory systems are used in communication In fact, it might be said that all social behavior constitutes communication.

Keywords

Killer Whale Bottlenose Dolphin Harbor Porpoise Purse Seine Physical Universe 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1990

Authors and Affiliations

  • Karen W. Pryor
    • 1
  1. 1.North BendUSA

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