Cognitive Performance of Dolphins in Visually-Guided Tasks

  • Louis M. Herman
Part of the NATO ASI Series book series (NSSA, volume 196)

Abstract

Sensory systems function to monitor events relevant to an animal’s well-being and success. In some cases, a sensory system also may serve as a valuable interface between the real world and higher cognitive centers that deal with abstractions, knowledge, generalizations, and representations. It is important to distinguish between these two functions--the strict biological and the cognitive--as they separate the relatively rigid, constrained system from the more open, flexible system. There is a difference, for example, between seeing a fish and then beginning a capture strategy, and seeing a television scene of a fish being captured and recognizing it as a representation of a real-world event.

Keywords

Comparison Stimulus Language Comprehension Bottlenosed Dolphin Visual Material Television Scene 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1990

Authors and Affiliations

  • Louis M. Herman
    • 1
  1. 1.Kewalo Basin Marine Mammal Laboratory and Department of PsychologyUniversity of HawaiiHonoluluUSA

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