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Working Mothers

  • Ruth L. Fuller
Part of the Women in Context book series (WICO)

Abstract

My interest in the concerns of the millions of working mothers in the United States has a long history. I am a working mother and come from a family of working mothers. During the past 25 years, in New York City and Denver, Colorado, the pleasures and conflicts of several hundred working mothers have been presented to me. These mothers represent a wide spectrum of ethnic, cultural, and educational backgrounds.

Keywords

Child Care Single Mother Child Psychiatry Maternal Employment Father Absence 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1990

Authors and Affiliations

  • Ruth L. Fuller
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of PsychiatryUniversity of Colorado Health Sciences CenterDenverUSA

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