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Foster Families: The Demands and Rewards of Being a Foster Mother

  • Paul M. Fine
  • Mary Pape
Part of the Women in Context book series (WICO)

Abstract

Willingness to parent other people’s children is one of our better human qualities. During 1982, in the United States, at least 425,000 children and adolescents lived in foster homes under public supervision (Edna Mc-Connell Clark Foundation, 1985). Providing foster parenting to young people whose family relationships have been disrupted is a demanding task that will not appeal to every family. Nevertheless, for certain individuals, being a foster parent is uniquely rewarding.

Keywords

Child Welfare Foster Care Foster Parent Foster Child Foster Family 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1990

Authors and Affiliations

  • Paul M. Fine
    • 1
  • Mary Pape
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of PsychiatryCreighton-Nebraska UniversitiesOmahaUSA
  2. 2.Iowa Western Community CollegeCouncil BluffsUSA

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