The Family as a Small Group

The Process Model of Family Functioning
  • Paul D. Steinhauer
Part of the Applied Clinical Psychology book series (NSSB)

Abstract

Two separate and largely unrelated streams of literature can emerge whenever several professional disciplines, each acting in isolation from the other, study a common clinical phenomenon from their own perspective and then proceed to communicate with their own colleagues via their own journals. Such was the case in the study of juvenile delinquency, where a self-report literature described a high incidence of mild and occasional antisocial behaviors. This contrasts markedly with studies of adjudicated delinquents, whose antisocial activities are more serious and more frequent and continue over a long period of time (Williams & Gold, 1972).

Keywords

Family Functioning Family Therapy Family Therapist Family System Role Conflict 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1987

Authors and Affiliations

  • Paul D. Steinhauer
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of PsychiatryHospital for Sick ChildrenTorontoCanada

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