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Psychopathology

A Behavior Genetic Perspective
  • Michael F. Pogue-Geile
  • Richard J. Rose
Part of the Applied Clinical Psychology book series (NSSB)

Abstract

The central task in family studies of psychopathology is the identification of the causes of individual variation and familial resemblance. Why and how do behavior disorders exhibit familial aggregation? How and why do siblings who are reared together exhibit differences in behavioral outcome?

Keywords

Genetic Influence Biological Parent Adoptive Parent Adoption Study Adoptive Family 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1987

Authors and Affiliations

  • Michael F. Pogue-Geile
    • 1
  • Richard J. Rose
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Psychology and Department of PsychiatryUniversity of PittsburghPittsburghUSA
  2. 2.Department of Psychology and Department of Medical GeneticsIndiana UniversityBloomingtonUSA

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