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The Application of Health Behavior Research

Health Education and Health Promotion
  • Lloyd J. Kolbe

Abstract

The great majority of the controllable risk factors associated with chronic diseases and traumatic injuries are behavioral in nature (National Center for Health Statistics, 1981; U.S. Department of Health, Education and Welfare, 1979). As a consequence, these risk factors, and the death and illness they cause, can be reduced by health promotion and health education interventions that apply the findings of behavioral research both to inform people about means to decrease behavioral risks, and to foster social and environmental changes that facilitate these behavioral changes. Health promotion and health education are based on knowledge generated by behavioral epidemiology as well as by basic health behavior research.

Keywords

Health Promotion Health Behavior Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System Seat Belt Health Promotion Program 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1988

Authors and Affiliations

  • Lloyd J. Kolbe
    • 1
  1. 1.Office of School Health and Special Projects, Division of Health Education, Center for Health Promotion and EducationU.S. Centers for Disease ControlAtlantaUSA

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