Health Behavior

Plural Perspectives
  • David S. Gochman

Abstract

What “health behavior” means, and how it is treated in this book, are the basic topics of the first part of this chapter, which begins with a working definition of health behavior, discusses some related terms, and provides a definition of “health behavior research.” The chapter continues with a discussion of conceptions of health, illness, and disease, and concludes by identifying some research issues that relate to these conceptions.

Keywords

Health Behavior Behavioral Health Behavioral Medicine Illness Behavior Sociocultural Perspective 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1988

Authors and Affiliations

  • David S. Gochman
    • 1
  1. 1.Raymond A. Kent School of Social WorkUniversity of LouisvilleLouisvilleUSA

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