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Maternal Employment and Children’s Development

An Integration of Longitudinal Findings with Implications for Social Policy
  • Adele Eskeles Gottfried
  • Allen W. Gottfried
Part of the Springer Studies in Work and Industry book series (SSWI)

Abstract

Does maternal employment affect children’s development? The body of data presented in the preceding chapters provides a foundation upon which to answer this question. In this chapter, results will be integrated to determine generalizability of findings across studies, and some of the most important processes pertaining to the relationship of maternal employment to children’s development will be highlighted. Directions for future research and implications for social policy are advanced.

Keywords

Child Care Maternal Employment Maternal Anxiety Maternal Attitude High Occupational Status 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1988

Authors and Affiliations

  • Adele Eskeles Gottfried
    • 1
  • Allen W. Gottfried
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Educational PsychologyCalifornia State University, NorthridgeNorthridgeUSA
  2. 2.Department of PsychologyCalifornia State University, FullertonFullertonUSA

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