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Maternal Employment, Family Environment, and Children’s Development

Infancy through the School Years
  • Adele Eskeles Gottfried
  • Allen W. Gottfried
  • Kay Bathurst
Part of the Springer Studies in Work and Industry book series (SSWI)

Abstract

Family patterns are undergoing rapid change in our society, in part a consequence of maternal employment. The proportion of employed mothers with children under 18 has shown a steady increase from 1940 to the present (Hoffman, 1984b), and projections are for this trend to continue (Hayghe, 1982). Two-earner families are now prevalent due to the increase of mothers’ employment (Hayghe, 1982). As a result of employment of both husbands and wives, family roles of men and women are changing as well (Hoffman, 1984b; Lamb & Sagi, 1983; Pleck, 1985). It is therefore reasonable to expect that home environments in dual- and single-earner families differ. The goal of this research is to determine how maternal employment relates to home environment and children’s development in a longitudinal study from infancy through the early school years.

Keywords

Home Environment Child Behavior Checklist Maternal Employment Father Involvement Maternal Involvement 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1988

Authors and Affiliations

  • Adele Eskeles Gottfried
    • 1
  • Allen W. Gottfried
    • 2
  • Kay Bathurst
    • 3
  1. 1.Department of Educational PsychologyCalifornia State University, NorthridgeNorthridgeUSA
  2. 2.Department of PsychologyCalifornia State University, FullertonFullertonUSA
  3. 3.Department of PsychologyUniversity of California, Los AngelesLos AngelesUSA

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