Knowledge, Action, and Control

  • Irene Martin
  • A. B. Levey
Part of the Perspectives on Individual Differences book series (PIDF)

Abstract

Underlying the cognitive and the behavioral approaches to clinical practice is a theoretical issue that is being addressed by academic theorists, but whose implications for behavior therapy are fundamentally important. The issue has appeared and reappeared a number of times but has never been satisfactorily resolved. It is the issue of the extent to which conscious awareness is involved in the control of behavior, or conversely, the extent to which effective behavior is dependant on conscious awareness.

Keywords

Conditioned Response Conditioning Performance Verbal Report Conscious Awareness Eyelid Conditioning 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1987

Authors and Affiliations

  • Irene Martin
    • 1
  • A. B. Levey
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of PsychologyInstitute of PsychiatryLondonEngland
  2. 2.MRC Applied Psychology UnitCambridgeEngland

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