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Behavioral Assessment A New Theoretical Foundation for Clinical Measurement and Evaluation

  • Ian M. Evans
  • Brett T. Litz
Part of the Perspectives on Individual Differences book series (PIDF)

Abstract

With proper measurement being so important for the progress of any scientific discipline, it is difficult to imagine behavior therapy developing in the absence of conceptual advances in behavioral assessment. In fact, careful assessment has been so integrally related to treatment design and evaluation in the behavioral tradition that some commentators are now bemoaning what they see as the growing segregation of professional concern for measurement and for intervention. The extremely rapid spawning of monographs, textbooks, and even journals specializing in behavioral assessment does seem to confirm some separation of identities. Before evaluating the situation too negatively, however, it is worth considering whether there might not be important concepts in assessment that require specific and detailed empirical analysis. One such topic could even be the investigation of how clinicians do, or could, use assessment information. It is arguable that the lackluster state of traditional psychological testing is a consequence of increasing preoccupation with the instruments themselves and less attention to their purpose and use (Glaser, 1981). In this chapter, therefore, we will examine some promising conceptual and methodological developments in assessment, but attempt to keep them closely related to the functions of behavioral measurement in the clinical endeavor.

Keywords

Behavior Therapy Bulimia Nervosa Target Behavior Behavioral Assessment Handicapped Learner 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1987

Authors and Affiliations

  • Ian M. Evans
    • 1
  • Brett T. Litz
    • 1
  1. 1.Psychology DepartmentState University of New York at BinghamtonBinghamtonUSA

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